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If I heavily modify my MoT exempt classic - will I alter the MoT exemption status?

I have a 1953 Morris Oxford MO which, as a historic vehicle, is MoT exempt. I would like to replace the original engine (now dead) to a more reliable and powerful one, maybe a V8 with updated suspension, brakes, etc. Will this modification alter the MoT exemption status?

Asked on 28 June 2017 by Carlos

Answered by Keith Moody
The short answer to this is no. From the DVSA’s perspective, the MoT is linked to the date of registration, so a 1953 Morris Oxford would not require an MoT - even if modified. However, if you modify the car extensively you will be required to re-register it. If you want to keep the original registration number your vehicle must meet a certain criteria. This is currently done on a points-based system and you'll need eight point or more, with five coming from having the original chassis, monocoque bodyshell or frame. Here's how the points are currently divided:

Chassis, monocoque bodyshell (body and chassis as one unit) or frame - original or new and unmodified (direct from manufacturer) 5
Suspension (front and back) - original 2
Axles (both) - original 2
Transmission - original 2
Steering assembly - original 2
Engine - original 1
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