Selling your classic car? It's FREE to list your car on Honest John Classics | No thanks

Is the BMW M3 a future collectable?

Do you think BMW M3 Convertibles (E93) - earlier, low mileage, around £20,000 - will hold their value, or continue to depreciate? Bearing in mind they're one of the last naturally aspirated V8 'sports' cars.

Asked on 23 November 2017 by David Brewster

Answered by Keith Moody
Generally, a car's depreciation curve hits bottom after 15 years - sometimes sooner, sometimes later. Most of the depreciation occurs within the first three years when a car's value is halved. The devaluation that occurs between, say, ten and 20 years of age is generally between 10 per cent and 20 per cent (of its initial purchase price). High-performance models aren't immune to this curve, although owners might not lose as much money. In the case of the BMW M3 (E93), the V8 sold for more than £50,000, and is now available to buy for £17,000 - £20,000. So you if you buy one now, you may see values hold steady or dip slightly - but value fluctuation should be limited. Do remember, though, that once cars pass the ten-year mark, the amount of money required to keep them on the road continues to increase at a high rate, which is where high-performance models can sting you because parts are often more expensive (this is true also of consumables, such as tyres).
Similar questions
Is the Saab 9-3 a future classic?
My car was in a smash and is being rebuilt. It's a Toyota Celica 1999 st200 1.8 coupe but I couldn't get the right bumper so put one on from a 1995 st202. The original st200 grill doesn't fit the st202...
I've owned a Ford Capri Injection for 23 years. In October 2015, I delivered my car to a local restoration bodyshop in order to have a bare metal respray carried out. The proprietor notified me that he...
Related models
Stormingly fast performance. Superb V8 engine sound. High quality interior. Great feelgood factor, yet still docile at low speeds. Available as coupe, convertible or saloon.
 

Ask Honest John