Dream car or Budget, which comes first? Tell us your thoughts | No thanks

The last golden-ish age of car choice?

Sorry for being late to the party, but a glimpse of the recent ?car enthusiasts ?a dying breed?? thread got me thinking.
Considering a period - of less than 10 years - from the late 60s into the early 70s, and merely considering small-medium family cars, there were such models as the:

Alfasud (flat 4)
Austin 1100 (hydrolastic suspension and great packaging)
Citroen GS (air-cooled flat 4 and hydropneumatic suspension)
Daf 66 (continuously-variable automatic transmission via rubber belts)
Fiat 128 (transverse engine with end-on gearbox)
Ford Escort/Cortina (utterly conventional)
Hillman Imp (rear inline engine canted over almost on its side)
Morris Minor/Traveller (from 1948 / part timber-framed)
NSU Ro80 (wankel)
Renault 10, 16, 12 (respectively, engine: rear, behind front axle, ahead of front axle)
Simca 1000 (inline rear engine)
Triumph Herald (separate chassis)
VW Beetle (air-cooled rear flat 4)
Wartburg Knight (3 cylinder 2-stroke)


In the above list - they weren't all good, but BY GUM there was a heck of a range to choose from!!

To think that in 1971 you could have been sitting at home pondering over the brochures trying to decide between a NEW Morris Minor - with no synchromesh on 1st gear, and a Citroen GS with aircooled flat 4, height-adjustable hydropneumatic suspension, and with the C-Matic: a manual shift but no clutch pedal...

Nowadays we're scratching our chin over a Focus or a Ceed. Or possibly just tossing a coin.

Now then, where do you set the anti-skating and recording-level on this ?ere i-pod thing??

Comments

Old Navy    on 9 June 2009

Depends if you are a "tinkerer" or "user". I think the golden age has arrived, other than routine sevicing it can be used. Nowadays I can get in my car and drive anywhere with a good chance of arriving and not breaking down on route. As a youngster I used to spend more time maintaining and fixing than using.

Bagpuss    on 9 June 2009

Not of course forgetting the VW411, a Cortina sized 4 door car with a 1.7litre rear mounted air cooled 4 cylinder boxer engine, electronic fuel injection, semi-trailing arm rear suspension and a supplementary petrol burning heater that worked independently of the engine.

Except that in 1971 my parents, like most people they knew, couldn't afford a new car. So that's changed for the better.

Sofa Spud    on 9 June 2009

Ah, but there were no MPVs in the 70's. The nearest you could get were minibuses based on Ford Transit / Bedford CF / BL Sherpa / VW Transporter.

Also, if you wanted a 4-wheel drive, there was just the Land Rover or maybe an imported Jeep CJ. The Range Rover came along, but was expensive and it was still intended as a work vehicle.

If you wanted a diesel car then it was either a Mercedes or perhaps a Peugeot 504, that was it.

Now we have hybrids filtering into the mainstream, with various different set ups.

Sofa Spud    on 9 June 2009

Quote:....""Not of course forgetting the VW411, a Cortina sized 4 door car with a 1.7litre rear mounted air cooled 4 cylinder boxer engine, electronic fuel injection, semi-trailing arm rear suspension and a supplementary petrol burning heater that worked independently of the engine.""

And VW nearly died around that time. They did bring out the water-cooled Front-wheel-drive K70, taken over from NSU, but that didn't save them. Just in the nick of time, they introduced the Golf and the rest is history.

bell boy    on 9 June 2009

Quote:....""Not of course forgetting the VW411
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>>>> ah yes the most common car to catch fire in that decade

Cliff Pope    on 9 June 2009

The golden age of choice was surely when you ordered a running chassis from the car company, and then had it fitted with the bodywork of your choice from the coachbuilders.

Pugugly    on 9 June 2009

In truth I don't think we've ever had it so good in the diversity of cars that are available now - if you want - whilst cars are frightfully complicated they are better made than anything in the list (possibly with the exception of the VW) - Ford Cortina or a nice Focus 3 - you choose.

doctorchris    on 9 June 2009

Most of the cars on your list, Tunacat, could regularly be seen by the side of the road, broken down, with the exception of the Fords (totally conventional) and, surprisingly, the Wartburg.

madf    on 9 June 2009

I drove many of the above list in the 1970s.

Put crudely, they were carp new and even worse when 2 years old..

Modern cars are lighyears better and cheaper.

perro    on 9 June 2009

I've actually worked on & driven every single one of those cars tuna - inc. the VW 411, K70 - even the Wankel.
I look back on them with fond memories and for some to say they were always at the side of the road, well ... they are just talking out of their exhaust pipes IMO.
Cars like the Citroen GS, Alfasod, Ro 80 - in fact most of those cars in your list were innovative and state of the art in some way.
Cars today, well - they certainly start "on the button, and yes - they are much more reliable - like my 1.8 Almera with its DOHC fuel injected variable valve timed lean burn techno but fun? well - we'll leave it there comrade!

mike hannon    on 9 June 2009

>Most of the cars on your list, Tunacat, could regularly be seen by the side of the road, broken down, with the exception of the Fords (totally conventional) and, surprisingly, the Wartburg.<

If you believe that, you never owned a Wartburg...

Lud    on 9 June 2009

Most of the cars on your list, Tunacat, could regularly be seen by the side of the road, broken down, with the exception of the Fords (totally conventional) and, surprisingly, the Wartburg.


VW Beetle was a byword for reliability and solidity.

Andrew-T    on 9 June 2009

In 1971 my parents couldn't afford a new car. So that's changed for the better ...


Well, yes and no. It's nice that all (or most) can afford a car (it doesn't have to be new) but because they can, the roads are all full. Swings and roundabouts, or traffic circles as the Canadians call them ...

Edited by Andrew-T on 09/06/2009 at 16:32

Alanovich    on 9 June 2009

Were Escorts/Cortinas of the time "utterly conventional", or did they set the conventions for decades to come?

Looking at that list, convention was a rare thing. And surely the point of the original post is the lack of convention at the time?

bell boy    on 9 June 2009

Peugeot 504 a proper car

Bagpuss    on 9 June 2009

Were Escorts/Cortinas of the time "utterly conventional" or did they set the conventions for decades
to come?


They were mechanically simple and built to minimal standards. If any car of the 70s set the conventions for decades to come it was the VW Golf.

daveyjp    on 9 June 2009

The Cortina was the first car to have the ventilation system we are now all familiar with vents each side of the dashboard and directional heating/cooling.

Bagpuss    on 9 June 2009

The Cortina was the first car to have the ventilation system we are now all
familiar with vents each side of the dashboard and directional heating/cooling.


Think you'll find that luxury cars had that feature many years before it appeared in the facelifted Cortina Mk3.

The first "normal" car I know of that had it was the Mercedes W114 from 1968.

Lud    on 9 June 2009

Think you'll find that luxury cars had that feature many years before it appeared in the facelifted Cortina Mk3.


I seem to remember the Cortina Mk 1 had eyeball vents at the ends of the facia. The ventilation was far better than in most cheap cars up to that point. Combined with the large glass area, it gave the Cortina a very pleasant airy feel. Also due a mention is the Ford gearbox already developed in the Anglia and those interim odd models, with Porsche-patented baulk ring synchromesh. It was a revelation at the time.

Old Navy    on 9 June 2009

Do I remember correctly that Ford made a big deal about the Cortinas "through flow ventilation" with outlets in the rear pillars?

sierraman    on 10 June 2009

Do I remember correctly that Ford made a big deal about the Cortinas "through flow
ventilation" with outlets in the rear pillars?


They did,so you do.

Old Navy    on 10 June 2009

Thanks sierraman, senility is not winning (yet)!

Pugugly    on 10 June 2009

There were two versions of the original Cortina - one had no ventilation over and above windows the facelifted version had the miraculous airflow stuff, which was genuine progress.

bell boy    on 10 June 2009

i think you are thinking consul cortina with no airflow
saw a mint one in a garage for sale at rhyl must be 25 years ago still remember it

Pugugly    on 10 June 2009

I think you might be right ! My dad had one HFF480 bought from Frances Garage in Deganway when he was at Valley. Blue with a white roof and the word CONSUL emblazoned in chrome on the smile the car always wore on the bonnet. My uncle had the posher version with the squared off indicator lights and the airflow vents.

Old Navy    on 10 June 2009

>>miraculous airflow stuff which was genuine progress.
>>
"Airflow" was the name I could not remember.

Edited by Old Navy on 10/06/2009 at 12:00

OldSock    on 9 June 2009

Interesting that you mention the Citroën GS.

A Citroën was, at one time, 'quirkiness made metal'. Unfortunately, many motorists - particularly the Brits - couldn't really cope with oleopneumatic suspension, revolving-drum speedometers, 'satellite' controls etc....

So Citroën, under the Peugeot cosh, steadily fought to eradicate all vestiges of quirkiness from their models - particularly the ZX, Xsara, Saxo.

What happened? These models then got roundly criticised for being "not quirky enough" to be a 'real Citroën'.

They just couldn't win, could they?!

bell boy    on 9 June 2009

OldSock i always remembered peugots for rust and lots of it,just like audi"s of the same era,they actually seemed worse than cortinas and austin 1100 "s to me,plus these cars were easier to fix and cheaper to fix too, so were always not highly sought at car auctions unlike hb vivas and mk 2 cortinas etc

gmac    on 9 June 2009

Austin 1100 my parents bought new in 1967-ish I'm guessing it was on an 'F' plate.
That was the last British car my old pop bought, it was a Fred Flintstone special before it was three years old, bottom completely rotted through.
I think it had a new engine before its second birthday too.

Next car was a new FIAT 128 in 1974 on an N, then a 128 Coupe in 1975 on a P. The P reg had a complete body respray before it was 5 years old and the doors weighed two tonnes each with body filler. I seem to remember a lot of time was spent stripping and cleaning the front brakes as they were constantly binding.

Happy days. Yeah right !

Pugugly    on 9 June 2009

Read somewhere that the Wartburg brand is going to be re-launched.....does it belong to BMW ???


Edit:- www.eisenachonline.de/nachrichten/archiv/2004.03.2...=

Edited by Pugugly on 09/06/2009 at 15:09

Lud    on 9 June 2009

I too have driven most of the cars mentioned by tunacat, although I have only owned a VW 411.

Surprised though not to see the Skoda Estelle mentioned, a car that continued to be made through the seventies and eighties. Despite its alleged bad reputation, the work of heehawing idiots like Jasper Carrott and thousands of prattish owners who couldn't drive or do simple maintenance, the Estelle in all its 1.2 and 1.3 litre variants was the most underrated economy car of its day although the 1 litre model was a bit of a slug. I owned five of those, cheap to run and terrific fun. They made a great noise trundling around town too, a mellow growl like a pre-war Austin 20 station taxi.

Quite ridiculous to dismiss all those cars as carp. Some of them were wonderful, for example the VW K70, and they all had that now rare quality, character, whose absence these days is a comfort to the modern passenger-carrying device user but is regretted by the motorist as was.

Pugugly    on 9 June 2009

Not saying they were all crap - most were decent drives in their times, just that times have changed and in my opinion there is less grey porridge on the roads these days - Never drove a K70 but I've always wanted an NSU Ro80 though.....

Andrew-T    on 9 June 2009

Less grey porridge on the roads these days ..


Grey porridge, you call it. The obsession for the last few years with tin-coloured cars (rather than distinct colours) has led to quite a porridge-like fleet on the roads. IMHO they look as though the topcoat was forgotten at the factory.

datostar    on 9 June 2009

I do wonder if, say, the US Navy suddenly found itself with a massive oversupply of grey ship paint and flogged it all off cheaply to car manufacturers. Not since the 1940's when virtually every car was black has there been such sameness of colour. I wouldn't have one on principle.

perro    on 9 June 2009

Read somewhere that the Wartburg brand is going to be re-launched.....does it belong to BMW ??? <<


Nah. GM - looks like it could be a V8 Insignia???

Alby Back    on 9 June 2009

Guy I was at uni with had a Wartburg Knight. He reckoned it earned him a better degree. No chance of sexual distraction y'see....

Pugugly    on 9 June 2009

Irrevocably linked to a Knicker thief I represented in the 80s sadly.

Alby Back    on 9 June 2009

Why ? Because they were pants ?

perro    on 9 June 2009

If I had to pick the best of the bunch from this list it would obviously have to be the NSU Ro 80 although the engine was a bit of a wankel :)
The worst, well - no contest really is it - The daft Daf, fore'runner of the Volvo 340 especially with that awful continuously variable rubber band!

Bagpuss    on 9 June 2009

Read somewhere that the Wartburg brand is going to be re-launched.....does it belong to BMW


I think the Wartburg brand belongs to Opel. They certainly took over the Eisenach factory in 1992. The factory originally belonged to BMW until 1946 when it was taken over by the Soviets and eventually became the place where Wartburgs were produced.

The name Wartburg, of course, sounds horrible in the English language but it is actually the name of the castle in Eisenach.

Lud    on 9 June 2009

The first post-war Moskvitches were clones of pre-war small Opels, made presumably in a factory and on machinery inherited by the Soviet Union after the war. Perhaps that was at Eisenach.

Bagpuss    on 9 June 2009

The first post-war Moskvitches were clones of pre-war small Opels made presumably in a factory
and on machinery inherited by the Soviet Union after the war. Perhaps that was at Eisenach.


Not quite.

The Russians were given pretty much the entire Opel factory at Ruesselsheim as war reparations. They took the machinery back to Moscow and gave it to a local car company who then started producing Opel copies under the name Moskvitch.

Edited by Bagpuss on 09/06/2009 at 16:30

datostar    on 9 June 2009

Now that was a car! I got one new in 1974, a 412 saloon. The straight line performance was phenomenal but the brakes and handling just weren't up to the power of the engine (although things did improve when I rapidly wore out the OE Russian crossply tyres and put Michelins on it). They had a 1500cc all aluminium crossflow engine, chain driven ohc and a twin choke carb. A friend of mine was inordinately proud of his Austin 1300GT and took the pink fluffy dice out of my Moskvich. We raced them at 6am one morning coming off nightshift along an uphill dual carriageway stretch of about 2 miles. The Moskvich sailed past him and just kept powering away. When we stopped at the top he couldn't believe what it had under the bonnet. Fortunately it was a straight road - bends and roundabouts would have been another story!
I eventually px'd it for an Austin 1800 and the dealer resold it the very same day.

Edited by Webmaster on 09/06/2009 at 22:40

tunacat    on 9 June 2009

[I think I didn?t mention the Skoda cos I?d already listed the R10 and Simca 1000 ;-)
BTW, do you think Skoda borrowed anything from the design of the Dauphine or R8?]

I guess we managed without MPVs when every occupant didn?t have to have their own seatbelt and sized-seat, and no town-dweller particularly felt in ?need? of a 4x4, despite there being a lot more winter snow in those times!

I suppose the equivalent GS / Minor choice today might be a Prius vs some double-cab pickup with a solid rear axle!

We know many of those cars were less-than-reliable, underdeveloped, rusted badly? but my point really was just what an astonishing range of configurations there were available just for yer standard family saloon.

No doubt evolutionary convergence is inevitable, but being an incurable car enthusiast, it does just sadden me a bit when, when considering a Focus/Golf/Ceed/Astra, any one of them would pretty much be perfectly acceptable, and one is down to debating the feel of the dash plastics and the length and breadth of the warranty.

There just aren?t enough ?bad? cars any more, to feel smug about having avoided!
(perhaps Peugeot should have been thanked for having managed to keep the 307 near the bottom of the user-ratings charts for so long!)

mike hannon    on 9 June 2009

>Read somewhere that the Wartburg brand is going to be re-launched.....<


I can't find SWMBO to read the German but it looks to me as though Opel are in it somewhere.
Oh well, I guess if Skoda can re-invent itself, why not Wartburg?
If the gear linkage doesn't fall through the floor it'll be progress...

Edited by Webmaster on 10/06/2009 at 01:36

Andrew-T    on 9 June 2009

Austin 1100 my parents bought new in 1967 was a Fred Flintstone special before it was three years old, bottom completely rotted through ..


In the 60s and 70s most owners expected their cars to rust, and the keen ones applied Waxoyl or the like to retard the rust. I drove an early 1100 in Canada from 1964 to 67, and the rust only set in after moving from Alberta (where they used no salt) to Ontario (where they did). I was very green then and wasn't prepared, but as the rust was not too obvious I sold the car to a Japanese and came back to the UK pronto :-)

Cars could vary a good deal in their rust resistance too, I suspect due to how much had set in on the sheet steel before the car was assembled.

Edited by Andrew-T on 09/06/2009 at 16:42

Lud    on 9 June 2009

There is still a choice of cars with character of course. But one may have to look in strange corners (Gwhizzes, Tata rickshaws and the like) or further up the market (LPG Bristols and Subarus, V6 Alfa 166s and some of these very good Lexus hybrids) instead of being inundated with cheap cars with all too much character...

Of course people are quite right to say that cars are better than they used to be. But so they should be. One would expect some evolution.

perro    on 9 June 2009

>>> but I've always wanted an NSU Ro80 though <<<

Wonderful cars pugley, and so advanced for their time ~
www.motorbase.com/vehicle/by-id/890/

Avant    on 9 June 2009

If there'd been a Backroom in the 1970s, we'd have all been saying thankfully how much better to drive and more reliable cars were than 30 years ago....and they were: Autocar, CAR and others said so, and I read them at the time.

Things like overhead valves, the SU carburetter, independent suspension, four and then five speed gearboxes, and (eventually and to start with not universally) better rustproofing taken together brought about the improvements that we take for granted now.

I've said this before on here but I'm sure that the 50s and 60s, pre-Leyland, Austins (A40, A50, A55, A60) were the first mass-produced cars which you could generally rely on to start promptly, hot or cold, and get you from A to B in comfort. They were far superior to the equivalent Fords, Vauxhalls and (especially) Hillmans, and also to the side-valve Morrises, although of course from the mid-50s onwards Morrises shared Austin mechanicals.

All very primitive compared with what we have now, but everything is relative. I don't myself feel too depressed about a lack of choice or variety, and still enjoy choosing a car from a long list and then a short list. And if you regret the smaller number of car makers, is there much difference between VW/Audi/Skoda/SEAT sharing oily bits and Austin/Morris/Wolseley/MG/Riley - or Hillman/Singer/Sunbeam/Humber?

What'll be interesting is to what extent cars will be able - or be allowed - to develop in the next 30-40 years.

Mebo    on 10 June 2009

It's funny when you look back at the items that manufacturers use to mention in their advertisements. I remember the first Fiesta in 1976 with "Negative Scrub Steering" or the Capri with "Fuel Injection". Then the "extras" - passenger side wing mirror, Break Boosters, Intermittent Wipers. On the mid range BL models you got "Flick Wipe" but only got intermittent ones at the top of the range. Who remembers the TV adverts for BL - "S Plate Specials" during the August letter changeover in the seventies?

andyp    on 10 June 2009

The "S plate special" advert is still on You Tube, or at least it was a couple of months ago when i stumbled across it, as is the original ad for the Metro when it was launched in 1980/1 !

Harleyman    on 10 June 2009

It's worth considering that most of the cars on the OP's list would be on their third or fourth major engine rebuild (assuming they hadn't rotted away in the meantime) long before they reached the six-figure mileages which we take for granted from most cars today.

I clearly remember a friend of mine who proudly boasted that his Cortina Crusader had clocked up 120,000 miles in eight years, before the engine needed reboring. That might not yet be the subject of a warranty claim on a modern car, but it would certainly make a prospective owner think twice about the longevity of the model!

That is not to say they were bad cars for their time, though, and I do despair of the "sameness" of modern cars.

Old Navy    on 11 June 2009

Although modern car engine durability may be down to better quality, modern lubricants must play a significant role.

Pugugly    on 11 June 2009

Didn't Ford have an "exclusive" 100,000 mile club ?

perro    on 11 June 2009

>>> though, and I do despair of the "sameness" of modern cars. <<<


Well ya'll just have to fork out for a metallic purple street cruiser :)

Harleyman    on 11 June 2009

Well ya'll just have to fork out for a metallic purple street cruiser :)


I'll stick to the 46 year old rust-and-faded-blue pick-up for cruising, thank you; it offends enough environmentalists and tree-huggers to justify its prodiguous thirst! ;-)

What puts me off modern cars is the sense that underneath, they ARE all the same; for instance, I liked the FIAT 500 a little less when I found out that it would essentially be the same as a Ford Ka.

There used to be a concept in biking during the late 70's and early 80's, called the UJM; the Universal Japanese Motorcycle. It came about because all four of the big manufacturers offered an inline four-cylinder engined bike as their top bike, and they all started to look and behave alike. Cars are going the same way; or is it just that I'm getting older? ;-)

captain chaos    on 12 June 2009

I'll stick to the 46 year old rust-and-faded-blue pick-up for cruising thank you; it offends
enough environmentalists and tree-huggers to justify its prodiguous thirst! ;-)

>>
Good man!
Always get a couple turning up at the local cruise. Original paint and that well worn look. SWMBO absolutely loves 'em. You just know that they'll run for ever. Must get one...

commerdriver    on 11 June 2009

Didn't Ford have an "exclusive" 100 000 mile club ?

Vauxhall certainly had something like that in the late 60s / early 70s

perro    on 12 June 2009

>What puts me off modern cars is the sense that underneath, they ARE all the same<

Yep! always have been really = A series + Fiords crossflow went on and on and on etc., etc., etc. - its all about con-sumer-ism really comrade Harley.

Harleyman    on 12 June 2009

its all about con-sumer-ism really

I'd suspect it's more about globalism. It wasn't that many years ago that you didn't need a badge on the bonnet to be able to tell virtually at a glance what country, or at least continent, a car hailed from. Now it's just a blur, and I suspect that this is what car enthusiasts miss most; the individual identities.

It's nothing to do with the cars themselves; you cannot reasonably argue that a Ford Anglia is a better car than a modern Fiesta for example, even though they occupy the same target sector of motorists. The fact is though that the aforementioned Anglia was a considerably different car to, say, a Vauxhall Viva; whether the Fiesta differs markedly from an Astra today is very much open to debate.

tunacat    on 12 June 2009

>>>"It's worth considering that most of the cars on the OP's list would be on their third or fourth major engine rebuild (assuming they hadn't rotted away in the meantime) long before they reached the six-figure mileages which we take for granted from most cars today."


Harleyman,
(though you've just brought things back on-topic, I'm just going to veer off slightly again here!)
Were they really as bad as that? As well as more modern lubricants, do you think it's at all possible that the engine longevity of more recent cars owes a lot to 5 speed gearboxes?

FWIW though, I had a 1098 Morris Minor which had 73k miles on it when I got it. To the best of my knowledge, it still had its original engine. And, astonishing when I think back now, a few years later I thought nothing at that time of embarking on a regime where I worked 130 miles away Mon-Fri, totalling 330-500 miles a week in it for 12 months, when it was 20 years old and already well into the 90k's (the 5-digit mileometer rolled-over to zero during the second month).
Near the end of that year, some seal went somewhere and it started spraying a pint of oil onto the floorpan every 20 miles, but in fairness it HAD been caned flat out at an indicated 80+ mph in the outside lane of the motorway for the final 35 miles of my journey every Friday teatime!

(I reckon the majority of the British population even today consider 100,000 miles to be pretty-much a 'life' for a car: There's only a minority of people who will enter into the purchase of a car with 90,000 miles on it confidently thinking "Great, that engine'll need nothing but routine servicing for the next 100k!
Most of those 70's cars would indeed have rotted away before their engines reached 100k, so I wonder how many of those engines WOULD actually have made it?")

Avant    on 12 June 2009

"As well as more modern lubricants, do you think it's at all possible that the engine longevity of more recent cars owes a lot to 5 speed gearboxes?"

Yes - I think it does. The opening of more motorways meant much more high-speed cruising, and if this was done in 4th at 4.000+ rpm it must have taken its toll.

That said, Tunacat's Minor 1000 doesn't surprise me: the A- and B-series engines were good and long-lasting, and coupled with SU carburettors would start first time hot or cold as well as getting you there. What a pity Leyland threw all the advantages away.

Edited by Avant on 12/06/2009 at 20:10

LikedDrivingOnce    on 13 June 2009

As stated by others, this IS the golden age in some ways. (Reliability, safety, kit levels etc)

However......there is one thing that I regret that you can't seem to find any more....and that is the practical sporty hatchback. Time was when you could get a four seater coupe with a hatch instead of a boot. For some reason manufacturers have gone off them.

Sure you can get a Scirocco. Great car, but only really a 2+2.

Not so long back you could get a Celica, 200 SX, Cougar, Corrado, Audi Quattro, Calibra. Both good looking AND practical.

Pugugly    on 13 June 2009

Audi A5 - BMW 3 Series Coupe - very pretty cars as are all Astra Sports. Plenty of swoopy Italian stuff.

LikedDrivingOnce    on 13 June 2009

Audi A5 - BMW 3 Series Coupe - very pretty cars as are all Astra
Sports. Plenty of swoopy Italian stuff.

Agreed. They are all handsome cars - but not very practical.
Take the BMW 3 Series Coupe. I wanted a BMW, and I wanted the Coupe, but could not live with the the fact that it only has a boot. (I need to carry stuff around). If it had been a hatchback, then it would have been ideal. A nice wide open space at the back with the seats folded down - perfect for my needs.
So I had to go for the Touring instead. What an ugly beast that is!
It is overkill. I don't need an Estate. A car with just a boot is too small. I need a hatchback, really.

But finding a hatchback that is good looking as well is like trying to find rocking horse droppings! :-(

Add a comment

 

Ask Honest John